You Are Enough

I like romance, I need someone who is affectionate, someone who will kiss me hello and goodbye, someone who hates the idea of a couple sitting apart on a sofa as much as I do. I want to be spoilt and I want someone to spoil right back. I believe in complete equality in a relationship and I don’t mean just that you take it in turns to play little spoon. I want to learn about someone, I want to be their best friend and I want them to be mine. I want someone to grow with, not just to grow old with.

I used to be afraid of saying all of the above. Afraid of being weird, prudish or uncool, afraid of being me. I sacrificed my happiness because I felt the real me wasn’t good enough for the world. “I am not enough” is my deeply ingrained, default mind set, for everything. I’m not intelligent enough to be talking to these people, I’m not funny enough to make that joke, I am not attractive enough to have that partner. As a result I have been incapable of saying “No” in the past. I’ve been unable to say “No” to dating someone I didn’t like, I’ve said “Yes” to sex I didn’t want and I’ve actively changed myself to meet another person’s need, to the detriment of my own. I destroyed partners where I felt I didn’t deserve a relationship, I have cheated where I seized attention and I have gratefully accepted damaging friendships because I didn’t feel worthy for more.

On paper Adam was a well-to-do dream; well spoken, well-educated, politically minded, career-minded, home-owner, cat-owner, plus I was physically attracted to him and apparently he liked me. In person, however, he showed no warmth, his kisses were never more than a peck and greetings were like hugging a cardboard cut-out. I couldn’t bring myself to put my arms around him, I wanted to kiss him but he had an exterior that meant I didn’t dare move in and he was incredibly, emotionally formal. I felt like I had to impress him and short of being constantly hypomanic that was never going to happen, I couldn’t be myself, I was afraid he wasn’t finding me funny, pretty or clever. This wasn’t a cute case of being love-struck this was complete incompatibility and I was desperately unhappy. A healthy person would have experienced this and left; I stayed and convinced myself I wasn’t miserable, that I couldn’t do better and that it would work if I changed myself enough. Besides, Adam validated me, my Mother enthusiastically approved, which made me think that maybe being on Adam’s arm would cure me of being less-than.

Taylor; a tall, Essexey, tattooed, smoking, divorcee who chose dogs over cats; A tradesman who drove a completely uneconomical and quite frankly, ridiculous car; A fully grown adult who wore baseball caps inside the house and spent a fortune on multi-coloured trainers. Plus, I had the constant urge to correct his grammar… Taylor also made me laugh, I pulled stupid faces at him and I knew he’d kiss me afterwards. I wasn’t afraid to hang off his neck or to curl up to him when I wanted. I would remove my make-up in front of him. He knew I watched “fluff” TV (in fact, we watched I’m a Celebrity together) and I didn’t stop dancing in the kitchen when he poked his head round the door and burst out laughing. I was happy with him, but one look at my Mother crinkling her nose at the thought of tattoos, cigarettes and an ex-wife and I stopped the conversation and agreed that Adam was perhaps the better choice.

If someone had asked me to choose to date someone who got on with everyone else or someone who got on with me I would have looked at them like they had lost the plot but hindsight shows me that that was the decision I was struggling with. I came unstuck because I didn’t believe that I had enough value to have my opinion, my wants and my needs accounted for. In the end I did choose Taylor and while we didn’t last, I enjoyed the time we spent together. Adam never stood a chance of being someone I wanted but I was contemplating sacrificing that just so that other people might like me more.

All the things I listed at the beginning of this post, well, I deserve all of those things. Not because I’m special but just because I’m me and I’m human and because everyone deserves those things, should they want them. Every emotion you have, every feeling you experience, every opinion you hold is valid and remembering that, is remembering that you are enough.

When I was in a particularly dark place a wonderful woman once said, “Who the hell do you think you are to be judging yourself that badly?” this person also showed me that my job was to love and look after myself; to show myself complete compassion, kindness and acceptance.

Today, I know that “I am enough” and I plan to act that way.

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